Transvision2010 presentation: Thinking about the hardware of thinking

I will be giving a presentation at Transvision2010, which takes place next weekend. The talk will be about how we should consider novel computing substrates on which to develop AI and ASIM (advanced substrate independent minds) technologies, rather than relying on conventional silicon processors. My main example will be that of developing learning applications on Quantum Computing processors (not entirely unpredictable!), but the method is generalisable to other technologies such as GPUs, biologically based computer architectures, etc…

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The conference is physically located in Italy, but I unfortunately cannot make in in person, as I will be attending another workshop. I will therefore be giving the talk remotely via the teleconferencing software Teleplace.

Anyway, here is some information about the talk, kindly posted by Giulio Prisco:

Thinking about the hardware of thinking:
Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?

Interesting news coverage of Teleplace QC talk

So I enjoyed giving my Teleplace talk on Quantum Computing on Satuday, and I received quite a lot of feedback about it (mostly good!).

My talk was reported on Slashdot via a Next Big Future writeup, which in turn linked to Giulio’s Teleplace blog! This level of coverage for a talk has been very interesting, I’ve never had anything linked from /. before. They unfortunately got my NAME WRONG which was most irritating. Although I’m fairly impressed now that if you Google for ‘my name spelt incorrectly + quantum computing’, it does actually ask if you meant ‘my name spelt correctly + quantum computing’ which is a small but not insignificant victory 🙂 Note: I’m not actually going to write out my name spelt incorrectly out here, as it would diminish the SNR!!

The talk also prompted this guest post written by Matt Swayne on the Quantum Bayesian Networks blog. Matt was present at the talk.

I’ve had a lot of people asking if I will post the slides online. Well here they are:

LINK TO SLIDES for QUANTUM COMPUTING: SEPARATING HOPE FROM HYPE
Teleplace seminar, S. Gildert, 04/09/10

quantum computing

Or rather, that’s a direct link to them. They are also available along with the VIDEOS of the talk and a bunch of other lectures and stuff are on the Resources page. Here are the links to the VIDEOS of the talk, and look, you have so many choices!!

  • VIDEO 1: 600×400 resolution, 1h 32 min
  • VIDEO 2: 600×400 resolution, 1h 33 min, taken from a fixed point of view
  • VIDEO 3: 600×400 resolution, 2h 33 min, including the initial chat and introductions and the very interesting last hour of discussion, recorded by Jameson Dungan
  • VIDEO 4: 600×400 resolution, 2h 18 min, including the very interesting last hour of discussion, recorded by Antoine Van de Ven
  • Here are a couple of screenshots from the talk:


    Online seminar on Quantum Computing

    I’m giving a VIRTUAL seminar in Teleplace this Saturday…

    I’m going to entitle the talk:

    ‘Quantum Computing: Separating Hope from Hype’
    Saturday 4th September, 10am PST

    “The talk will explain why quantum computers are useful, and also dispel some of the myths about what they can and cannot do. It will address some of the practical ways in which we can build quantum computers and give realistic timescales for how far away commercially useful systems might be.”

    Here’s Giulio’s advertisement for the talk:
    GIULIO’S BLOGPOST about quantum computing seminar which is much more explanatory than the briefly thrown together blogpost you are being subjected to here.

    Anyone wishing to watch the talk can obtain a Teleplace login by e-mailing Giulio Prisco (who can be contacted via the link above). Teleplace is a piece of software that is simple to download and quick to install on your computer and has an interface a bit like Second life. Now is a great time to get an account, as there will be many more interesting lectures and events hosted via this software as the community grows. Note the time – 10am PST Saturday morning (as in West Coast U.S. time zone, California, Vancouver, etc.)

    The seminar is also listed as a Facebook Event if you would like to register interest that way!

    ASIM-2010 – not quite Singularity but close :)

    So I’ll post something about the Singularity Summit soon, but first I just wanted to talk a little about the ASIM-2010 conference that I helped organise along with Randal Koene.

    The main idea of the conference was to hold a satellite workshop to the Singularity Summit, with the purpose of sparking discussion around the topics of Substrate Independent Minds. See the carboncopies website for more information on that! Ah, I love the format of blogging. I’m explaining what happened at a workshop without having introduced the idea of what the workshop was trying to achieve or what our new organisation actually *is*. Well, I promise that I’ll get round to explaining it soon, but until then it will have to be a shadowy unknown. The carboncopies website is also in the process of being filled with content, so I apologise if it is a little skeletal at the moment!

    One interesting thing that we tried to do with the workshop was to combine a real life and a virtual space component. It was an interesting experience trying to bring together VR and IRL. In a way it was very fitting for a workshop based around the idea of substrate independent minds. Here we were somewhat along the way to substrate independent speakers! I am hoping that this will inspire more people to run workshops in this way, which will force the technology to improve.

    I was very pleased too see so many people turning out. We had about 30 people in meatspace and about another 15 in virtual space on both days. Giulio Prisco has some nice write-up material about the workshops, including PICTURES and VIDEOS! Here are the links to his posts:

    General overview
    First day in detail
    Second day in detail

    For a first attempt, I don’t think that things went too badly! The technology wasn’t perfect, but we gave it a good try. The main problem was with the audio. Teleplace, the conferencing software we were using, works well when everyone in online with a headset and mic, there are no feedback problems. However, when you try and include an entire room as one attendee, it becomes a little more tricky.

    This could be improved by either everyone in the room having headsets and mics, and then having a mixer which incorporated all the input into a single Teleplace attendee. The other way is that everyone in the room could also be logged into Teleplace with their own headsets and mics. *Make* that Singularity happen, ooh yeah! (/sarcasm)

    Experimental investigation of an eight-qubit unit cell in a superconducting optimization processor

    Anyone who follows this blog and wants to get a real in-depth insight into the way that D-Wave’s processors are built, and how they solve problems, should definitely read this paper:

    Phys. Rev. B. 82, 024511 (2010), R. Harris et al.

    The paper itself is quite long (15 pages) but it really gives a great description of how an 8-qubit ‘portion’ of the processor is designed, fabricated, fit to a physical (quantum mechanical) model, calibrated, and then used to solve problems.

    If you don’t have access to the Phys Rev B journal, you can read a free preprint of the article here. And if you’ve never tried reading a journal paper before, why not give it a go! (This is an experimental paper, which means there are lots of pretty pictures to look at, even if the Physics gets hard to follow). For example, a microphotograph of the 8-qubit cell:

    Simulating Chemistry using Quantum Computers

    Nice preprint from the Harvard group introducing quantum computing for chemical simulation, including a great deal about AQC and how to apply it to such systems, e.g. lattice protein folding and small molecules. Includes references to some experimental and simulation work done at D-Wave (write-up for that in progress).

    Simulating Chemistry using Quantum Computers

    A particularly bad attack on the Singularity

    Whilst I am not a raging advocate of ‘sitting back and ‘waiting’ for the Singularity to happen (I prefer to get excited about the technologies that underlie the concept of it), I feel that I have a responsibility to defend the poor meme in the case where an argument against is is actually very wrong, such as in this article from Science Not Fiction:

    Genomics Has Bad News For The Singularity

    The basic argument that the article puts forward is that the cost of sequencing the human genome has fallen following a super-exponential trend over the past 10 years. And yet, we do not have amazing breakthroughs in drug treatment and designer therapies. So how could we expect to have “genuine artificial intelligence, self-replicating nanorobots, and human-machine hybrids” even though Moore’s law is ensuring that the cost of processing power is falling? And it is falling at a much slower rate than genome sequencing costs!

    The article states:

    “In less than a decade, genomics has shown that improvements in the cost and speed of a technology do not guarantee real-world applications or immediate paradigm shifts in how we live our day-to-day lives.”

    I feel however, that the article is somewhat comparing apples and oranges. I have two arguments against the comparison:

    The first is that sequencing the genome just gives us data. There’s no algorithmic component. We still have little idea of how most of the code is actually implemented in the making of an organism. We don’t have the protein algorithmics. It’s like having the source code for an AGI without a compiler. But we do have reasonable physical and algorithmic models for neurons (and even entire brains!), we just lack the computational power to simulate billions of neurons in a highly connected structure. We can simulate larger and larger neural networks as hardware increases in speed, connectivity, and efficiency. And given that the algorithm is ‘captured’ in the very structure of the neural net, the algorithm advances as the hardware improves. This is not the case in genome sequencing.

    The second argument is that sequencing genomes is not a process that can be bootstrapped. The very process of knowing a genome sequence isn’t going to help us sequence genomes faster or help you engineer designer drugs. But building smart AI systems – or “genuine artificial intelligence” as the article states – CAN enable you to bootstrap the process, as you will have access to copyable capital for almost no cost: Intelligent machines which can be put to the task of designing more intelligent machines. If we can build AIs that pass a particular threshold in terms of being able to design improved algorithmic versions of themselves, why should this be limited by hardware requirements at all? Moore’s law really just gives us an upper bound on the resources necessary to build intelligent systems if we approach the problem using a brute-force method.

    We still need people working on the algorithmic side of things in AI – just as we need people working on how genes are actually expressed and give rise to characteristics in organisms. But in the case of AI, we already have an existence proof for such an object – the human brain, and so even with no algorithmic advances, we should be able to build one in-silico. Applications for genomics do not have such a clearly defined goal based on something that exists naturally (though harnessing effetcs like the way in which cancer cells avoid apoptosis might be a good place to start).

    I’d be interested in hearing people thoughts on this.